Doja Cat's Twitter account hacked to promote meme token

Tweet by Doja Cat: "buy $DOJA or else" followed by a Solana address. There's a photo of her brandishing a toy scimitar and she's wearing a chainmail hood.Tweet from Doja Cat's hacked account (attribution)
The Twitter account belonging to rapper Doja Cat was compromised on July 8, tweeting to her 5.6 million followers that they should "buy $DOJA or else", and various other messages to that effect. Doja Cat quickly posted on her Instagram account to say that the Twitter account had been compromised.

The attacker appeared to have only marginal success, as the token reached a market cap of around $500,000 before collapsing by 96%.

Hackers have compromised a string of celebrity Twitter accounts to promote memecoins recently, including those of Hulk Hogan and Metallica.

50 Cent claims his accounts were compromised to promote a memecoin

Tweet by 50cent: "Get Rich or Die Tryin! 💪🏾 Get the official $GUNIT Now"Scam tweet from 50 Cent's account (attribution)
50 Cent has claimed his Twitter account and website were hacked to promote a memecoin called $GUNIT. "I have no association with this crypto," the rapper wrote on Instagram.

50 Cent also claimed in the post that "Who ever did this made $300,000,000 in 30 minutes." It's not clear where 50 Cent got this number, because the token has only done $19.8 million in volume. One wallet made around $722,000 off the token, and three others also made over $100,000.

Memecoin team accused of hacking influencer Twitter account to manipulate markets

According to crypto sleuth zachxbt, the team behind the Solana-based $CAT memecoin hacked the Twitter account of "Gigantic-Cassocked-Rebirth" (@GCRClassic) crypto influencer.

First, the team sniped their own $CAT token launch to obtain 63% of the token supply, ultimately selling a portion of it for around $5 million. Then, they took out $2.3 million and $1 million long positions on the ORDI and ETHFI tokens, respectively. Finally, they posted from the compromised influencer account to shill the ORDI and ETHFI tokens to his massive following. Ultimately, their gambit doesn't appear to have been incredibly successful: they made around $34,000 on the ORDI position, but lost $3,500 on the ETHFI position. However, as zachxbt noted, it's possible they also opened positions on centralized exchanges where the outcomes aren't publicly visible.

Caitlyn Jenner launches memecoin amid deepfake confusion

Tweet by Caitlyn Jenner: "make america great again!!! 🇺🇸 and we love crypto! @pumpdotfun 🫡" with a photo of Jenner grasping hands with Donald TrumpJenner's launch tweet (attribution)
Olympic athlete-turned-Trumpworld media personality Caitlyn Jenner has confused many by apparently launching a memecoin on pump.fun and heavily promoting it on her Twitter account with more than 3 million followers. Her original post featured a photo of her grasping hands with Donald Trump, with the text "make america great again!!! 🇺🇸 and we love crypto!".

At first, people widely believed her account had been hacked, given how frequently celebrity token promotions turn out to be compromised Twitter accounts. Then, she began joining Twitter spaces and posting videos about the token, but with the emergence of more and more convincing deepfakes, even those didn't convince people that it was truly Jenner behind the token.

Despite the confusion — or perhaps because of it — the token has been popular.

The token launch was linked to Sahil Arora, a person allegedly connected to multiple celebrity rug pulls and pump-and-dumps. However, Jenner quickly turned on Arora shortly after the token's launch, posting on Twitter "FUCK SAHIL! He scammed us! BIG TIME!" and that "Sahil appears to be fully out".

Jenner is not the first in her family to get mixed up with crypto. In October 2023, her stepdaughter Kim Kardashian was fined over $1 million for unlawful touting of a crypto security.

Scammers hack Twitter account of late actor Matthew Perry, solicit "donations" for "substance abuse charity"

Matthew PerryMatthew Perry (attribution)
There are evidently no lows to which crypto scammers will not sink.

Some scammers were able to compromise the Twitter account belonging to the Friends star Matthew Perry, who passed away in October 2023. He had spent much of his life battling addiction, and his death was drug-related.

The scammers took advantage of this to share crypto addresses that they claimed would funnel donations to the real Matthew Perry Foundation, which actually tries to help those battling addiction. However, in a post on Perry's other social media accounts, the Foundation clarified that they had nothing to do with the wallets or the Twitter posts, and described the website as "fraudulent".

$440,000 stolen as MicroStrategy's Twitter account is hacked

Michael Saylor sitting in front of a large model shipMichael Saylor (attribution)
MicroStrategy, the company founded and chaired by Bitcoin maximalist Michael Saylor, suffered a Twitter account compromise on February 26. Although MicroStrategy ostensibly develops software, it's better known for its massive Bitcoin holdings, driven by Saylor.

Although Saylor has been publicly critical of Ethereum, that didn't seem to raise flags among those eager to receive an airdrop of the Ethereum-based "MSTR" token that the company's Twitter account claimed they had just launched. Those who fell for the phishing link were redirected to a website that spoofed the real MicroStrategy website, with malicious code that drained funds.

Around $440,000 was stolen thanks to the fake announcement, with the majority of it coming from one wallet that was drained of a variety of tokens notionally worth around $425,000.

Vitalik Buterin's Twitter account hacked to promote crypto scam

Scam tweet from the Vitalik Buterin account, reading: "To celebrate Proto-Danksharding coming to Ethereum, @Consensys is marking the moment with a commemorative NFT.
"Proto", honors the work of the devs who made this possible. The collection is free for the next 24 hours.
Claim your piece of history:"Scam tweet by Vitalik Buterin (attribution)
The Twitter account belonging to Vitalik Buterin, inventor and effective leader of the Ethereum project, was hacked to promote a crypto scam. A tweet posted to his compromised account advertised a "commemorative NFT" to celebrate the impending release of "proto-danksharding", which is the actual name for an upcoming change to the Ethereum protocol.

However, the link was a scam, and anyone who connected their wallet risked having their wallet drained of its cryptocurrency and NFTs. Some blue-chip NFTs were stolen, including two CryptoPunks (a collection with a floor price of around 47 ETH, or $76,800). Altogether, stolen assets surpassed $650,000 in value within a few hours of the theft according to zachxbt, though this counts notoriously difficult-to-value NFTs.

The tweet was taken down within twenty minutes of being posted. All in all, posting a link to a wallet drainer was probably among the least effective things the attacker could do with the Twitter account of a person whose word can dramatically move markets.

It did seem to be something of a stark warning to some in the crypto world, however, who expressed sentiments along the lines of "if Vitalik can get hacked, anyone can."

Hackers swipe pricey NFTs after compromising Gutter Cat Gang Twitter profile

A leopard-spotted cat with half-lidded eyes, wearing a black doo-rag and white shirt with "HODL" printed on it, on a purple backgroundGutter Cat #707 (attribution)
An attacker successfully compromised the Twitter account belonging to the popular Gutter Cat Gang NFT project, as well as the one belonging to the project co-founder, and used them to post links to phishing sites claiming to be a new NFT airdrop. Instead of receiving the tokens they were promised, those who authorized the contract had their wallets drained.

One victim lost 36 NFTs, among them a Bored Ape NFT they'd purchased for around $130,000. Altogether, the attackers successfully stole NFTs worth between $750,000 and $900,000, depending on how resale value is estimated.

The following day, Gutter Cat Gang announced that they'd regained control over the Twitter accounts and taken down the malicious tweets. They stated that they were working with law enforcement to investigate the theft, but to the dismay of some victims, did not describe any plans to compensate those who lost assets.

Hackers steal around $170,000 after compromising Steve Aoki's Twitter account

Headshot of Steve AokiSteve Aoki (attribution)
Twitter account compromises remain a lucrative way to scam crypto enthusiasts. Someone was able to compromise the Twitter account belonging to electronic musician and crypto enthusiast Steve Aoki, posting a fake link to his NFT project that drained unsuspecting traders' wallets.

The scam was helped along by ben.eth, a Twitter personality who retweeted one of the tweets by the compromised account in which Aoki appeared to endorse a token created by ben.eth. According to crypto sleuth zachxbt, multiple followers of ben.eth were impacted by his retweet, which zachxbt characterized as "quote tweet[ing] a phishing scam posted by the compromised @steveaoki account for clout". Ben.eth ultimately promised to reimburse his fans who lost money thanks to his tweets.

Hacked Azuki Twitter account enables theft of pricey NFTs and crypto priced at more than $1.74 million

A green zombie-looking ape with a red warty mouth and sharp teeth, with a turquoise hachimaki and a tie-dye shirtMutant Ape #16924, which most recently sold for ~$23,400 (attribution)
Hackers were able to compromise the Twitter account belonging to the popular Azuki NFT project, which they then used to promote a fake NFT drop to its 334,000 followers. Users who tried to mint the NFTs instead had their wallets emptied of pricey NFTs and cryptocurrencies.

Stolen NFTs included 74 Otherdeeds (floor price ~$2,700 each), 3 Porsche NFTs (floor ~$3,100), 57 Beanz (floor ~$2,600), 12 Doodles (floor ~$10,600), 2 Mutant Apes (floor ~$24,300), and 49 Pudgy Penguins (floor ~$9,200) to the attacker. Altogether, those stolen NFTs could fetch almost ~$1 million if sold at floor price.

One single wallet transferred 750,000 of the USDC stablecoin to the attacker, resulting in a particularly brutal loss for one individual.

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